Real World Dilemmas of the Hunger Games: Liberty and Security [Teaser] | Learn Liberty

LEARN LIBERTY ACADEMY

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From Rags to Riches: The Cayman Islands Revolution | Learn Liberty

The rule of law, Hayek wrote, is “a rule concerning what the law ought to be”: It ought to be general and abstract; equally applied, with legal privileges for none; certain, not subject to arbitrary changes; and just. In this Learn Liberty Academy, Andrew Morriss sets sail to show how the law of the Cayman Islands conforms with Hayek’s ideals, how it got that way through astute political entrepreneurship, and how the world at large benefits from its legal wisdom. The benefits of Caymanian rule of law are so diffuse and far-reaching that we can even attribute the American poor’s high consumption of healthcare to it. Embark on Morriss’s expedition — read, watch lectures, and discuss!

See the video here!

From Rags to Riches: The Cayman Islands Revolution | Learn Liberty

The rule of law, Hayek wrote, is “a rule concerning what the law ought to be”: It ought to be general and abstract; equally applied, with legal privileges for none; certain, not subject to arbitrary changes; and just. In this Learn Liberty Academy, Andrew Morriss sets sail to show how the law of the Cayman Islands conforms with Hayek’s ideals, how it got that way through astute political entrepreneurship, and how the world at large benefits from its legal wisdom. The benefits of Caymanian rule of law are so diffuse and far-reaching that we can even attribute the American poor’s high consumption of healthcare to it. Embark on Morriss’s expedition — read, watch lectures, and discuss!

See the video here!

Frank Underwood's Top 3 Lessons for the Voting Public | House of Cards Review | Learn Liberty

Some say House of Cards presents a cynical picture of politics, but Prof. Steve Horwitz suggests the political picture in Netflix’s original series may be more realistic than we might hope. The show follows Frank Underwood’s quest for ultimate power, and the highly anticipated second season was released Feb. 14. What, if anything can we learn from House of Cards? Prof. Horwitz finds three lessons: 1. As a general principle, we should be very skeptical of politicians; 2. House of Cards shows the constant backroom trading of favors among politicians, their staffers, special interests, and the occasional member of the public; and 3. Politics attracts those who are especially skilled at public relations, favor trading, and power plays, not necessarily those who best serve the public interest. What can we do to protect our country and change government so it better serves the public interest? Prof. Horwitz argues that we need to change incentives and prevent politicians from making backroom deals and trading favors. A limited government is necessary to prevent the self-interest of politicians from leading to disastrous results for the American people. How realistic do you think the political portrait in House of Cards is? What, if anything, do you think should be done to change the political system in the United States today?